Best Management Practices (BMPs) for Utility Scale Solar Sites

Jun 28, 2024 | Industrial Solar | 1 comment

“This document reflects … scientific opinion and position on these issues as of May 12, 2024, and will be revised and updated as needed due to changes in research findings or regulations.”

“Even relatively small local projects (< 5 MW) can lead to significant landscape impacts since it takes up to 10 acres/MW to accommodate panels, drainage and stormwater systems, access roads, collection & transmission infrastructure, and buffer areas. While the intensity of impacts varies dramatically based on local site conditions and infrastructure development practices, anywhere from 10% to > 75% of the existing soil landscape will undergo some level of significant disturbance at most sites. Significant areas of most sites will remain bare for some period of time during active site installation and then complete stabilization and revegetation generally takes several years. While less than 50% of the solar farm site is actually covered by panels, the combination of soil disturbance/compaction and the impervious cover from the panels may lead to enhanced runoff, particularly in the early years before the site is fully stabilized.”

“overview of the challenges that USS development, active
management and closure potentially poses to local soil and water quality over varying time scales along with our recommended best management practices (BMPs). Minimizing overall soil disturbance, particularly via limiting net cut/fill and grading is of paramount importance. Limiting and remediating soil compaction during all phases of site development, active management and closure is also critically important to enhance rainfall infiltration vs. runoff and maintain and restore overall soil quality.”

1) https://landrehab.org/wp-content/uploads/2024/05/USS-White-Paper-5-12-24.pdf
2) https://landrehab.org/home/programs/solar-farms/

1 Comment

  1. Kenda Hanuman

    This is important

    Reply

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